Classic Monsters are a group of characters that encapsulates the dozens of original Hollywood films released during the 1920s to the 1950s and also includes more modern movie monsters. These films encompass a great many genres from horror to fantasy and romance, but all incorporate a horror character, and are intended to thrill or scare the audience. The first film was a silent film version of The Hunchback of Notre Dame, which was released in 1923. The films that followed were cinematic representations of popular horror stories. This included Frankenstein, The Invisible Man, The Wolf Man, and the Creature from the Black Lagoon. They were hugely popular in movie theaters during the first half of the twentieth century.

What was the first monster movie?

The first monster movie was The Golem, it was released in 1915 and directed by Paul Wegener and Henrik Galeen. The Golem was a German silent film and the first to include a monster. The film was shortly followed by Nosferatu (1922), Die Nibelungen (1924), and Dracula (1931).

Who are the Universal Monsters?

The Universal Monsters include Dracula, Frankenstein, The Mummy, The Invisible Man, The Phantom of the Opera, The Wolf Man, and The Creature from the Black Lagoon. Other Universal Monsters include Ygor, the Bride of Frankenstein, and Mr. Hyde. Universal Monsters consists of the horror villains that come together for a shared goal and mission.

When do the classic Universal monster movies take place?

The period of time when the classic Universal monster movies take place depends on the movie, but most take place between the late 1800s and the early 1900s. The classic Universal monster movies create a shift in reality and as a consequence the time period they take place in is uncertain.

Classic Monsters Guides
Browse through our curated Classic Monsters Guides for additional categorizations, tips, details, variations, styles, and histories of Classic Monsters. Guides provide additional insights into the unique properties and shared relationships between elements.
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7’ | 2.13 m
Bride of Frankenstein (1935)
Bride of Frankenstein
213.000
1935.00
40000
3D
Bride of Frankenstein
6’5” | 1.96 m
Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954)
Creature from the Black Lagoon
196.000
1954.00
56000
3D
Creature from the Black Lagoon
Dracula
122000
6’4” | 1.93 m
Dracula (novel, 1897), Dracula (film, 1931)
Dracula
193.000
1897.00
122000
3D
Dracula
8’ | 2.4 m (novel)
Frankenstein (novel, 1818), Frankenstein (film, 1931)
Frankenstein’s Monster
240.000
1818.00
211000
3D
Frankenstein’s Monster
Gort
9700
8’ | 2.4 m
The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)
Gort
240.000
1951.00
9700
3D
Gort
Gremlin
51000
24” | 61 cm
Gremlins (1984)
Gremlin
61.000
1984.00
51000
3D
Gremlin
Igor
47000
5’7” | 1.70 m
Frankenstein (1931), Young Frankenstein (1974)
Igor
170.000
1931.00
47000
3D
Igor
5’7” | 1.70 m
The Invisible Man (novel, 1897), The Invisible Man (film, 1933)
Invisible Man
170.000
1897.00
42000
3D
Invisible Man
Nosferatu
153000
6’3” | 1.91 m
Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror (1922)
Nosferatu
191.000
1922.00
153000
3D
Nosferatu
6’2” | 1.88 m
Le Fantôme de l'Opéra (1909), The Phantom of the Opera (1925)
Phantom of the Opera
188.000
1909.00
201000
3D
Phantom of the Opera
5’11” | 1.8 m
The Mummy (1932)
The Mummy
180.000
1932.00
71000
3D
The Mummy
Vampira
21000
5’7” | 1.70 m
The Vampira Show (1954)
Vampira
170.000
1954.00
21000
3D
Vampira
6’2” | 1.88 m
The Wolf Man (1941)
Wolf Man
188.000
1941.00
5100
3D
Wolf Man
Wolf Man
Series of illustrations of the Wolf Man in assorted postures with overall height labeled

The Wolf Man is the second werewolf movie from Universal Pictures, released in 1941, and supremely more popular than its predecessor Werewolf of London. In this film, Larry Talbots is transformed into a werewolf after being bit by one while trying to protect his love interest’s friend. After being bitten, Larry is informed by a gypsy that he will turn into a werewolf since he was bitten and lived. This proves to be true, and throughout the rest of the film Larry struggles with his werewolf desire to kill and his human desire to not. Larry is finally killed by his own father when he attacks his love interest. As he dies, he transforms back into his human form and his father and lover mourn his tragic end.

The Wolf Man, portrayed by Lon Chaney Jr. in The Wolf Man (1941), is 6 foot 2 inches (1.88 m) tall.

The Wolf Man is the second werewolf movie from Universal Pictures, released in 1941, and supremely more popular than its predecessor Werewolf of London. In this film, Larry Talbots is transformed into a werewolf after being bit by one while trying to protect his love interest’s friend.

The Wolf Man, portrayed by Lon Chaney Jr. in The Wolf Man (1941), is 6 foot 2 inches (1.88 m) tall.

Wolf Man
Height:
6’2” | 1.88 m
Width:
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
Area:
Actor
Lon Chaney Jr.
First Appearance
The Wolf Man (1941)

Drawings include:
Wolf Man front (arms raised), side (walking), side (sniffing)

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Gremlin
Assortment of drawings of a Gremlin seen from the front and side with overall height dimensions

Gremlins are creatures of folklore, similar to goblins or fairies, famous for causing havoc. Gremlins came to public attention during World War II when they were blamed for technological malfunctions on aircrafts, especially with the Royal Air Force. These Gremlins were typically depicted with spiked backs, sharp teeth, claws, and large eyes. There is also a movie, Gremlins (1984), but these creatures bare little resemblance to the folklore creatures, except for their malicious desire for harm and havoc. In physical appearance, the Gremlins from the movie, Gremlins, resemble a Furby, a popular children’s toy from the late 1990s and early 2000s.

Gremlins, as represented in Gremlins (1984), are roughly 24 inches (61 cm) tall.

Gremlins are creatures of folklore that are famous for causing havoc. Gremlins are typically depicted with spiked backs, sharp teeth, claws, and large eyes. In Gremlins (1984), the creatures bare little resemblance to the folklore creatures, except for their malicious desire for harm and havoc.

Gremlins, as represented in Gremlins (1984), are roughly 24 inches (61 cm) tall.

Gremlin
Height:
24” | 61 cm
Width:
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
Area:
Actor
Peter Cullen
First Appearance
Gremlins (1984)

Drawings include:
Gremlin front, front (aggressive), side

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Igor
Dimensioned collection of illustrations of Igor in a range of postures from standing upright to hunched and walking

Igor is a generic hunchbacked henchman trope character that appears in a variety of films as a servant to the main antagonist. The very first appearance of an Igor character was in the 1927 film Metropolis, though the character is never named or credited. The next, and most notable, appearance of Igor was in the 1931 film Frankenstein. However, the character’s name was actually Fritz and in Mary Shelley’s original novel Frankenstein did not have an assistant. Despite the inconsistencies in the actual names of the henchmen or their roles, the name Igor, or stylized as Ygor, appears to be the default nickname for all horror assistants.

Igor, portrayed by Marty Feldman in Young Frankenstein (1974), is 5 foot 7 inches (1.70 m) tall.

Igor is a generic hunchbacked henchman trope character that appears in a variety of films as a servant to the main antagonist. Despite the inconsistencies in the actual names of the henchmen or their roles, the name Igor appears to be the default nickname for all horror assistants.

Igor, portrayed by Marty Feldman in Young Frankenstein (1974), is 5 foot 7 inches (1.70 m) tall.

Igor
Height:
5’7” | 1.70 m
Width:
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
Area:
Actor
Dwight Frye (Fritz), Marty Feldman (Igor)
First Appearance
Frankenstein (1931), Young Frankenstein (1974)

Drawings include:
Igor front (upright), hunched, walking

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Frankenstein’s Monster
Multiple illustrations of Frankenstein's Monster standing, walking, and reaching with overall height measurements

Frankenstein’s monster, frequently and inaccurately referred to as Frankenstein, is a tragic villain from Mary Shelley’s 1818 novel Frankenstein. Frankenstein created his monster through a blend of chemistry and alchemy; creating an 8 foot tall, hideous creature that just wanted to be loved. Once shut out of the human society he so desperately wanted to belong to, Frankenstein’s monster sought revenge on his creator, Frankenstein. The novel is also referred to as The Modern Prometheus as a nod to the Greek myth of Prometheus, a character who created humans out of clay and gifted them with fire.

Frankenstein's Monster is described as being 8 foot (2.4 m) tall in Mary Shelley's novel, Frankenstein (1818). Frankenstein's Monster was first portrayed by 5 foot 11 inch (1.8 m) tall Boris Karloff in Frankenstein (1931) with the assistance of lifted boots.

Frankenstein’s monster, frequently and inaccurately referred to as Frankenstein, is a tragic villain from Mary Shelley’s 1818 novel Frankenstein. Frankenstein created his monster through a blend of chemistry and alchemy; creating an 8 foot tall, hideous creature that just wanted to be loved.

Frankenstein's Monster is described as being 8 foot (2.4 m) tall in Mary Shelley's novel, Frankenstein (1818). Frankenstein's Monster was first portrayed by 5 foot 11 inch (1.8 m) tall Boris Karloff in Frankenstein (1931) with the assistance of lifted boots.

Frankenstein’s Monster
Height:
8’ | 2.4 m (novel)
Width:
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
Area:
Actor
Boris Karloff (5’11” | 1.8 m)
First Appearance
Frankenstein (novel, 1818), Frankenstein (film, 1931)

Drawings include:
Frankenstein's Monster front, front (walking), side

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The Mummy
Collection of illustrations of the Mummy in various horror postures with overall height measurements

The use of the character of a Mummy, an undead creature under wraps and bandages, originates from nineteenth century Britain when they were colonizing Egypt. Originally, the Mummy was a female portrayed love interest. It was not until 1932, when the romantic Mummy archetype was replaced with the monster Mummy by Boris Karloff’s movie The Mummy. Now joining the ranks of Dracula and Frankenstein’s monster, the Mummy has been seen as an antagonist in works of horror despite a slight revival of the romantic archetype towards the end of the twentieth century.

The Mummy, portrayed by Boris Karloff in The Mummy (1932), is 5 foot 11 inches (1.8 m) tall.

The use of the character of a Mummy, an undead creature under wraps and bandages, originates from nineteenth century Britain when they were colonizing Egypt. It was not until 1932, when the romantic Mummy archetype was replaced with the monster Mummy by Boris Karloff’s movie The Mummy.

The Mummy, portrayed by Boris Karloff in The Mummy (1932), is 5 foot 11 inches (1.8 m) tall.

The Mummy
Height:
5’11” | 1.8 m
Width:
Length:
Depth:
Weight:
Area:
Actor
Boris Karloff
First Appearance
The Mummy (1932)

Drawings include:
The Mummy front (arms raised), front, side

Details & Downloads

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